17 Pics That Reveal A Fake Neighborhood Built By The US Army

During World War 2, the US Army requested thousands of B-17 Bomber planes. They were produced in this Boeing factory in Seattle which, clearly, had to be secured against any attack. In order to protect it against air strikes, they hired Hollywood set designers to build a fake neighborhood on top of it and inhabited the area with actors.

This may look like an ordinary neighborhood, but it's not.

This may look like an ordinary neighborhood, but it's not.

It was built on top of a Boeing factory in Seattle, in order to protect it from air strikes in WWII.

It was built on top of a Boeing factory in Seattle, in order to protect it from air strikes in WWII.

From above, it looked like a regular neighborhood.

From above, it looked like a regular neighborhood.

However, none of the trees, houses, cars, or streets were real.

However, none of the trees, houses, cars, or streets were real.

The fake neighborhood was built in 1944 and removed a year after the war.

The fake neighborhood was built in 1944 and removed a year after the war.

Hollywood set designer John Stewart Detlie used the same techniques as in the movies.

Hollywood set designer John Stewart Detlie used the same techniques as in the movies.

Fake streets, sidewalks, trees, fences, cars, and houses were set in place to create the illusion of a real neighborhood.

Fake streets, sidewalks, trees, fences, cars, and houses were set in place to create the illusion of a real neighborhood.

But underneath it, 30,000 workers were building 300 bombers per month to support the war against the Nazis.

But underneath it, 30,000 workers were building 300 bombers per month to support the war against the Nazis.

From above, this structure looked like a car parked on a street.

From above, this structure looked like a car parked on a street.

Joyce Howe and Susan Heidreich, walking over the camouflaged Boeing Plant 2

Joyce Howe and Susan Heidreich, walking over the camouflaged Boeing Plant 2

After the war, in the 1960s, the first Boeing 737s were assembled here, but the production was eventually moved to the neighboring Thompson SIte. Later, in the 1980s, this site was used as a machine shop, but that ultimately ended as work turned to more modern facilities. The structure fell into decay and in 2010, Boeing began the demolition of the plant.

Here's how it looks now.

Here's how it looks now.

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